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"getRecordsByIds"

Abstract

getRecordsByIds retrieves one or more records from a database table using their IDs.

The "getRecordsByIds" action retrieves one or more records from a database table using their IDs. The response message contains one record for each ID specified in the "id" array.

Things to know

  • A table must have a primary key or ID to retrieve records.

  • Tables created by the "createTable" action, automatically have an auto increment "id" field indexed as a primary key.

  • Tables created by other APIs may not have an "id" field; instead, they may have a primary key index that includes one or more fields in the table.

  • The "getRecordsByIds" action provides an optional "primaryKeys" property that can retrieve records using any primary key index.

  • The "primaryKeys" property:

    • can be used to retrieve one or more records from a database table using primary key identifiers

    • is required if "id" is omitted

    • is "null" if using "ids"

  • The "id" property:

    • is required if "primaryKeys" is omitted and supplied by the client to uniquely identify each request

    • is "null" if using the "primaryKeys" property

    • is the client's message identifier and should be a string containing a value that is unique to the client

    • may also be a number, array, or object (this is discouraged)

  • In asynchronous protocols, such as MQTT, "getRecordsByIds" enables the client to associate response messages with the original request messages since the server adds this property (with the client's value) to each response message.

  • JSON DB API sends a response message with an error if "id" is missing or null. Although jsonAction allows the "id" to be null or omitted, JSON DB API does not.

  • The server includes the "id" in reply messages using the exact value and data type that the client supplied in the request. If the client sends a string, the server replies with the identical string. If it sends a number, the server replies with the identical number. This behavior is required by jsonAction.

    Note

    A string is preferred because it is the fastest and easiest for the server to return the identical value. If a number is used, it should be an integer to avoid differences in binary rounding behavior between the client and the server.

  • The "id" should be unique from the client's perspective. From the server's perspective, the true unique "id" of a request-response message pair is the combination of the client id plus the server’s auth id for that client.

    Note

    The "id" will likely not be unique from the server's perspective since different clients can use the same "id" values).

Usage scenarios:
  • Retrieving one record by its ID

  • Loading a previously saved set of IDs to quickly retrieve a set of records

  • Using foreign key IDs to look up records

Performance considerations:
  • The fastest way to retrieve a specific record is to look it up by its ID.

  • Results start to return more slowly as more records are requested.

Request examples

Arrays request example

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "getRecordsByIds",
  "authToken": "replaceWithAuthtokenFromCreateSession",
  "requestId": "1",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "athlete",
    "ids": [
      3
    ]
  },
  "responseOptions": {
    "dataFormat": "arrays"
  }
}
{
  "api": "db",
  "authToken": "replaceWithAuthtokenFromCreateSession",
  "action": "getRecordsByIds",
  "requestId": "2",
  "params": {
    "databaseName": "ctreeSQL",
    "tableName": "athlete",
    "primaryKeys": [
      [
        {
          "fieldName": "id",
          "value": 3
        }
      ]
    ]
  },
  "responseOptions": {
    "dataFormat": "objects"
  }
}
{
  "api": "db",
  "apiVersion": "1.0",
  "requestId": "3",
  "authToken": "replaceWithAuthtokenFromCreateSession",
  "action": "getRecordsByIds",
  "params": {
    "databaseName": "ctreeSQL",
    "ownerName": "admin",
    "tableName": "athlete",
    "ids": [
      6,
      2,
      4
    ]
  },
  "responseOptions": {
    "binaryFormat": "hex",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "numberFormat": "string",
    "includeFields": [],
    "excludeFields": []
  },
  "debug": "max"
}

Response examples

Arrays response example

{
  "authToken": "authToken",
  "result": {
    "dataFormat": "arrays",
    "binaryFormat": "hex",
    "fields": [
      {
        "name": "id",
        "type": "bigint",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": false,
        "primaryKey": 1,
        "autoValue": "incrementOnInsert"
      },
      {
        "name": "changeId",
        "type": "bigint",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "changeId"
      },
      {
        "name": "name",
        "type": "varchar",
        "length": 30,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "ranking",
        "type": "smallint",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": false,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "birthDate",
        "type": "date",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "playerNumber",
        "type": "number",
        "length": 32,
        "scale": 6,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "livedPast2000",
        "type": "bit",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "earnings",
        "type": "money",
        "length": 32,
        "scale": 4,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "favoriteSaying",
        "type": "varchar",
        "length": 500,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      }
    ],
    "data": [
      [
        3,
        1291366,
        "Muhammad Ali",
        3,
        "1942-01-17",
        1,
        true,
        60000000,
        "Float like a butterfly, sting like a bee."
      ]
    ],
    "primaryKeyFields": [
      "id"
    ],
    "changeIdField": "changeId",
    "moreRecords": false,
    "requestedRecordCount": 0,
    "returnedRecordCount": 1,
    "totalRecordCount": 1
  },
  "requestId": "3",
  "debugInfo": {
    "request": {
      "authToken": "authToken",
      "api": "db",
      "action": "getRecordsByIds",
      "params": {
        "databaseName": "ctreeSQL",
        "tableName": "athlete",
        "primaryKeys": [
          [
            {
              "fieldName": "id",
              "value": 3
            }
          ]
        ]
      },
      "requestId": "2",
      "responseOptions": {
        "dataFormat": "arrays"
      },
      "debug": "max"
    },
    "serverSuppliedValues": {
      "databaseName": "ctreeSQL",
      "ownerName": "admin"
    },
    "errorData": {
      "errorData": null
    },
    "warnings": []
  },
  "errorCode": 0,
  "errorMessage": ""
}
{
  "authToken": "authToken",
  "result": {
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "hex",
    "fields": [
      {
        "name": "id",
        "type": "bigint",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": false,
        "primaryKey": 1,
        "autoValue": "incrementOnInsert"
      },
      {
        "name": "changeId",
        "type": "bigint",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "changeId"
      },
      {
        "name": "name",
        "type": "varchar",
        "length": 30,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "ranking",
        "type": "smallint",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": false,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "birthDate",
        "type": "date",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "playerNumber",
        "type": "number",
        "length": 32,
        "scale": 6,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "livedPast2000",
        "type": "bit",
        "length": null,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "earnings",
        "type": "money",
        "length": 32,
        "scale": 4,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      },
      {
        "name": "favoriteSaying",
        "type": "varchar",
        "length": 500,
        "scale": null,
        "defaultValue": null,
        "nullable": true,
        "primaryKey": 0,
        "autoValue": "none"
      }
    ],
    "data": [
      {
        "birthDate": "1969-01-03",
        "changeId": "1291366",
        "earnings": "990000000",
        "favoriteSaying": "Once something is a passion, the motivation is there.",
        "id": "6",
        "livedPast2000": true,
        "name": "Michael Schumacher",
        "playerNumber": "1",
        "ranking": "6"
      },
      {
        "birthDate": "1895-02-06",
        "changeId": "1291366",
        "earnings": "800000",
        "favoriteSaying": "Every strike brings me closer to the next home run.",
        "id": "2",
        "livedPast2000": false,
        "name": "Babe Ruth",
        "playerNumber": "3",
        "ranking": "2"
      },
      {
        "birthDate": "1940-10-23",
        "changeId": "1291366",
        "earnings": "115000000",
        "favoriteSaying": "Everything is practice.",
        "id": "4",
        "livedPast2000": true,
        "name": "Pele",
        "playerNumber": "10",
        "ranking": "4"
      }
    ],
    "primaryKeyFields": [
      "id"
    ],
    "changeIdField": "changeId",
    "moreRecords": false,
    "requestedRecordCount": 3,
    "returnedRecordCount": 3,
    "totalRecordCount": 3
  },
  "requestId": "3",
  "debugInfo": {
    "request": {
      "authToken": "authToken",
      "api": "db",
      "action": "getRecordsByIds",
      "params": {
        "databaseName": "ctreeSQL",
        "ownerName": "admin",
        "tableName": "athlete",
        "ids": [
          6,
          2,
          4
        ]
      },
      "apiVersion": "1.0",
      "requestId": "3",
      "responseOptions": {
        "binaryFormat": "hex",
        "dataFormat": "objects",
        "numberFormat": "string",
        "includeFields": [],
        "excludeFields": []
      },
      "debug": "max"
    },
    "serverSuppliedValues": {
      "databaseName": "ctreeSQL",
      "ownerName": "admin"
    },
    "errorData": {
      "errorData": null
    },
    "warnings": []
  },
  "errorCode": 0,
  "errorMessage": ""
}

"params"

The "params" property is an object that contains an action's parameters. Each action defines its own required and optional properties.

Property summary

Table 1. "params" property summaries

Property

Description

Default

Type

Limits (inclusive)

"databaseName"

contains the name of a database

Defaults to the "defaultDatabaseName" value that is set during "createSession"

string

Minimum length: 1
Maximum length: 64

"ids"

contains a unique identifier for a row in a table

Note

Mutually exclusive with "primaryKeys".

"null"

Note

Required when "primaryKeys" is omitted.

array

"ownerName"

contains the unique name of a schema in a database

""

string

Minimum length: 1
Maximum length: 64

"primaryKeys"

contains key values used by "getRecordsByIds" to find and return one or more records

Note

Mutually exclusive with "ids"

"null"

Note

Required when "ids" is omitted.

array of arrays

"tableName"

contains the name of a table

Required - No default value

string

Minimum length: 1
Maximum length 64


The "databaseName" property is an optional string that specifies the database that contains the tables. It defaults to the database name supplied at login.

Note

In the API Explorer, "defaultDatabaseName" is set to "ctreeSQL" in the "createSession" action that happens at login.

Things to know:
  • A zero-length "databaseName" is invalid.

  • Its limits are from 0 to 64 bytes.

  • If the "databaseName" property is omitted or set to null, the server will use the default database name specified at login.

  • If no default database is specified during "createSession", "defaultDatabaseName" will be set to the "defaultDatabaseName" value that is specified in the services.json file.

The "ids" property is an array that contains a unique identifier for a row in a table. Its default value is "null" but it is required if the "primaryKeys" property is "null" or not specified.

Things to know:
  • The "ids" property is mutually exclusive with the "primaryKeys" property meaning it is required when "primaryKeys" is omitted or an error is returned if both have values.

  • It is typically an array of integers ("ids": [1,3,5]).

  • It can be an array of an array of strings ("ids": ["9555444333222111","9555444333222112", "9555444333222113"]).

    • A string "id" supports numbers larger than 9,007,199,254,740,991.

    • This is the largest number supported by many programming languages and JSON parser implementations that use IEEE double-precision floats to hold numbers.

  • It can be the primary key value of another field in the table making it useful when your table is created by another API, such as SQL, that allows any field in the table to be the primary key.

    If your table does not have an "id" field but uses a "vin" field as the primary key, you can use vin values to look up records ("ids": [ "4Y1SL65848Z411439", "1HGBH41JXMN109186" ]).

  • If your table uses more than one field as the primary key, you must use the "primaryKeys" property to look up records.

    Tip

    The "getRecordsByIds'' action uses a primary key index to look up records. A primary key index must be a unique, non-null index without conditional filtering. For best performance and maximum simplicity, create tables using the JSON DB API because it automatically creates an auto increment "id" field that is indexed as a primary key.

The "ownerName" property is an optional string from 1 to 64 bytes that specifies the account that owns an object.

Things to know:
  • The "ownerName" property is optional and has a dynamic default value.

  • If the "ownerName" property is omitted or set to null, the server uses the value of the "defaultOwnerName" property supplied during the "createSession" action.

  • If the "defaultOwnerName" property is not defined, the server uses the "admin" as the owner name.

  • The owner of an object has administrative rights over that object.

  • The "ownerName" property is a namespace for an object. You can think of it as a container of objects.

    The "ownerName" allows users to use any name for the objects they create — for example, a QA engineer may copy tables into their owner space to run a set of tests.

    It is common for a user to create their own copies of objects from other accounts for testing, troubleshooting, and fixing data. The copied objects can retain the same name because the "ownerName" distinguishes between them.

  • The fully qualified name of an object is the "databaseName", "ownerName", and the object's name, such as "tableName" meaning a FairCom server may contain many tables with the name "mytable" as long as each one is in a different database or in a different owner space.

    For example, an organization often creates different databases for different phases of the development lifecycle, such as dev, test, stage, ua, and prod. Each of these databases contains the same set of objects with the same names. Applications leave the "databaseName" out of their JSON actions and use the "defaultDatabaseName" property to specify the target database.

  • Queries and scripts are often written without specifying "databaseName" and/or "ownerName", allowing queries and scripts to work properly when run in different databases or in different schemas.

The "primaryKeys" property is an array of arrays that contain key values used by the "getRecordsByIds" action to find and return one or more records. The default value is "null" but it is required if the "ids" property is omitted.

Things to know:
  • "primaryKeys" is best used if tables were created with primary keys composed of multiple fields. If primary keys are composed of a single field, it is best to use "ids".

    Note

    Tables created using JSON DB API actions cannot create primary keys composed of multiple fields.

  • A table must have a primary key defined in order to use "primaryKeys"

  • The "primaryKeys" property is mutually exclusive with the "ids" property meaning it is required when "ids" is omitted or an error is returned if both have values.

  • The  "primaryKeys" property is an array of arrays

    • The outer array contains one or more primary key definitions which allow the server to retrieve multiple records at a time.

    • Each inner array is a primary key definition that specifies the values the server needs to retrieve one matching record.

    • A primary key definition consists of one or more objects where each object is a field-value pair that uses the following structure ({ "fieldName": "someField","value": "someValue" }).

Example

If your table uses the "first_name" and "last_name" fields as the primary key, the following "primaryKeys" property will retrieve two records.

Note

If your table does not have a primary key, its records cannot be retrieved, updated or deleted using the "getRecordsByIds", "updateRecords" and "deleteRecords" actions. Other getRecords actions can query its records.

   "primaryKeys": 
    [ 
      [
        { "fieldName": "first_name", "value": "Sam" },
        { "fieldName": "last_name",  "value": "I-am" }
      ],
      [
        { "fieldName": "first_name", "value": "The Cat" },
        { "fieldName": "last_name",  "value": "in the Hat" }
      ]
    ]

The "tableName" property is an optional string that contains the name of an integration table or MQTT topic that holds the topic's messages. It defaults to an empty string.

Things to know:
  • You can use a topic name for an MQTT table because FairCom automatically generates a table name for each topic.

  • A "tableName" cannot begin with a number.

  • It refers to the name of the integration table that stores a topic’s messages and is used to rename that table or assign a new topic to an existing integration table.

  • MQTT automatically creates an integration table for each new topic it receives. Thus, when a message is sent to a topic, FairCom Edge automatically creates a table to hold it.

  • As you refine your integration processes, you may want to rename an integration table to better label the data it holds. You can use the "tableName" property of the "configureTopic" action to rename an integration table.

  • The "alterIntegrationTable" action can also be used to rename an integration table, but it is less convenient because you must know the original name of the integration table.

"result"

Property summary

Table 2. "result" property summaries

Property

Description

Type

Limits (inclusive)

"binaryFormat"

designates how binary values are returned

string enum

"base64"
"hex"

"data"

contains an array or object that the server returns, such as records returned by a query

Note

It is an empty array when there are no results available.

array

Its contents are determined by the action

"dataFormat"

defines the format of the data in the "data" property

string

"autoDetect"
"arrays"
"objects"

"fields"

shows an array of objects set by the server where each object is the definition of a field in a table defining the details of each field returned by a query

array

"primaryKey"

represents the order of the primary keys in the index

Note

When "primaryKey" is 0 it means a field is not part of a primary key.

integer

0 - 255

"requestedRecordCount"

shows how many records were requested in the "getRecordsFromCursor" action to determine if fewer records were returned than were requested

integer

0 - 2147483647

"returnedRecordCount"

shows how many records were returned from the "getRecordsFromCursor" action to determine if fewer records were returned than were requested

integer

0 - 2147483647

"totalRecordCount"

contains an integer, the server sets its value to the number of records returned by a query

integer

-1 - 99,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999,999



The "binaryFormat" property designates how binary values are formatted in the JSON request and JSON response message. The default value is "base64".

Note

Typically, response options apply only to the server’s response, but the "binaryFormat" property applies to both the request and the response.

Things to know:
  • The "binaryFormat" property may occur inside "params""responseOptions", "defaultResponseOptions" , and "result".

  • When "binaryFormat" occurs in "params" it specifies how the sender represents binary values.

    For example, when  "binaryFormat" is set to "hex", the FairCom server expects the binary values of fields and keys to be represented in strings with hexadecimal format.

  • When "binaryFormat" occurs in "responseOptions" or "defaultResponseOptions" it specifies how the FairCom server should represent binary values in responses.

    For example, when "binaryFormat" is set to "hex", the FairCom server represents binary values in strings with hexadecimal format.

  • When "binaryFormat" occurs in "result" it signifies how binary values are represented.

    For example, when "binaryFormat" is set to "base64", the FairCom server represents binary values in the response in base64 format.

  • The following are the possible values for each format.

    • "base64"

      When the server reads and writes from a binary field, it represents the binary value as a base64 string.

      • This is the default

      • "base64" strings contain the following characters:

        • 0-9

        • A-Z

        • a-z

        • +

        • /

        • =

    • "hex"

      When the server reads and writes from a binary field, it represents the binary value as a hexadecimal string.

      • Hexadecimal is easier for people to read and convert to binary.

      • Hexadecimal creates a larger payload than "base64", which makes it less efficient for data transmission.

      • Hexadecimal strings contain the following characters:

        • 0-9

        • A-F

    • "byteArray"

      When the server reads and writes from a binary field, it represents the binary value as an array of bytes.

      • An array of bytes is easiest for a program to manipulate.

      • An array of bytes creates a larger payload than "base64" and "hex", which makes it less efficient for data transmission.

      • An array of bytes returns a JSON array containing one integer number between 0 and 255 for each byte in the binary value:

        • "aBinaryField": [ 255, 0, 255 ]

Examples

Create a "binary_test" table

This example creates a table containing one binary field named "bin" with a fixed length of 5 bytes.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "createTable",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "fields": [
      {
        "name": "bin",
        "type": "binary",
        "length": 5
      }
    ]
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Insert a record into the "binary_test" table using an array of bytes format

This example inserts a record with the ASCII characters "123" in the "bin" field. The value of "bin" is represented as an array of bytes.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "insertRecords",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "byteArray",
    "sourceData": [
      {
        "bin": [49,50,51]
      }
    ]
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Insert a record into the "binary_test" table using hexadecimal format

This example inserts a record with the ASCII characters "123" in the "bin" field. The value of "bin" is represented as a string in hexadecimal format.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "insertRecords",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "hex",
    "sourceData": [
      {
        "bin": "313233"
      }
    ]
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Insert a record into the "binary_test" table using base64 format

This example inserts a record with the ASCII characters "123" in the "bin" field. The value of "bin" is represented as a string in base64 format.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "insertRecords",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "base64",
    "sourceData": [
      {
        "bin": "MTIz"
      }
    ]
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Retrieve a record with "binaryFormat" as an array of bytes

This example requests the first record in the "binary_test" table with the value of "bin" represented as an array of bytes.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "getRecordsByTable",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "maxRecords": 1
  },
  "responseOptions": {
    "binaryFormat": "byteArray",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "numberFormat": "number"
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Response

Note

Our examples insert only 3 bytes into "bin" . Because the "bin" field has a fixed-length if 5 bytes, the server pads unused bytes with 0x00 and stores the result. When a record is retrieved, the server returns all 5 bytes.

{
  "authToken": "authtokenFromServer",
  "result": {
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "byteArray",
    "fields": [
      { "name": "id",       "type": "bigint", "length": null, "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": false, "primaryKey": 1 },
      { "name": "changeId", "type": "bigint", "length": null, "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": true,  "primaryKey": 0 },
      { "name": "bin",      "type": "binary", "length": 5,    "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": true,  "primaryKey": 0 }
    ],
    "data": [
      {
        "bin": [49,50,51,0,0],
        "changeId": 50217,
        "id": 1
      }
    ],
    "moreRecords": true,
    "requestedRecordCount": 1,
    "returnedRecordCount": 1,
    "totalRecordCount": 3
  },
  "errorCode": 0,
  "errorMessage": ""
}

Retrieve a record with "binaryFormat" as hexadecimal

This example requests the first record in the "binary_test" table with the value of "bin" represented as a hexadecimal string.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "getRecordsByTable",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "maxRecords": 1
  },
  "responseOptions": {
    "binaryFormat": "hex",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "numberFormat": "number"
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Response
{
  "authToken": "authtokenFromServer",
  "result": {
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "byteArray",
    "fields": [
      { "name": "id",       "type": "bigint", "length": null, "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": false, "primaryKey": 1 },
      { "name": "changeId", "type": "bigint", "length": null, "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": true,  "primaryKey": 0 },
      { "name": "bin",      "type": "binary", "length": 5,    "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": true,  "primaryKey": 0 }
    ],
    "data": [
      {
        "bin": "3132330000",
        "changeId": 50217,
        "id": 1
      }
    ],
    "moreRecords": true,
    "requestedRecordCount": 1,
    "returnedRecordCount": 1,
    "totalRecordCount": 3
  },
  "errorCode": 0,
  "errorMessage": ""
}


Retrieve a record with "binaryFormat" as base64

This example requests the first record in the "binary_test" table with the value of "bin" represented as a base64 string.

{
  "api": "db",
  "action": "getRecordsByTable",
  "params": {
    "tableName": "binary_test",
    "maxRecords": 1
  },
  "responseOptions": {
    "binaryFormat": "base64",
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "numberFormat": "number"
  },
  "authToken": "replaceWithValidAuthtoken"
}
Response
{
  "authToken": "authtokenFromServer",
  "result": {
    "dataFormat": "objects",
    "binaryFormat": "byteArray",
    "fields": [
      { "name": "id",       "type": "bigint", "length": null, "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": false, "primaryKey": 1 },
      { "name": "changeId", "type": "bigint", "length": null, "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": true,  "primaryKey": 0 },
      { "name": "bin",      "type": "binary", "length": 5,    "scale": null, "autoTimestamp": "none", "defaultValue": null, "nullable": true,  "primaryKey": 0 }
    ],
    "data": [
      {
        "bin": "MTIzAAA=",
        "changeId": 50217,
        "id": 1
      }
    ],
    "moreRecords": true,
    "requestedRecordCount": 1,
    "returnedRecordCount": 1,
    "totalRecordCount": 3
  },
  "errorCode": 0,
  "errorMessage": ""
}


The "dataFormat" property is an optional, case-insensitive string enum that defines the format of the response in the "data" property. The default format is an array of arrays. The alternative is an array of objects. The default for "dataFormat" can be changed during a "createSession" action by assigning a different value to the "dataFormat" property in "defaultResponseOptions".

There are three different (but similar) versions of the "dataFormat" property:

Two of those versions occur in a request and another occurs in a response. They all indicate how data is formatted.

  • "dataFormat" in the request inside "responseOptions" determines how the "data" property in the response is formatted.

    Possible values include:

    • "arrays"

      This is the default and causes the server to return results as an array of arrays, which is the most efficient.

    • "objects"

      This returns results as an array of objects. This is less efficient but is simpler to generate, read, and troubleshoot.

  • "dataFormat" in the request in the "params" object notifies the server how the "sourceData" property is formatted in the request. This version is rarely used because of the default "autoDetect" behavior.

    Possible values include:

    • "arrays"

      This causes the server to return results as an array of arrays, which is the most efficient.

    • "objects"

      This returns results as an array of objects. This is less efficient but is simpler to generate, read, and troubleshoot.

    • "autoDetect"

      This is the default and causes the server to automatically detect the format of the data in the "sourceData" property.

  • "dataFormat" in the response shows the client how the server formatted the "data" property.

    Possible values include:

    • "arrays"

      This is the default and causes the server to return results as an array of arrays, which is the most efficient.

    • "objects"

      This returns results as an array of objects. This is less efficient but is simpler to generate, read, and troubleshoot.

The "fields" property is a required array of field-type objects. There is one object for each top-level field in the array. Each object identifies the actual data type of the field as stored in the database.

A field-type object is used when creating a table. It contains one object for each field definition returned in the data.

Full request example

"fields": 
[
    {
      "name": "name",
      "type": "varchar",
      "length": 50,
      "scale": null,
      "defaultValue": null,
      "nullable": false,
      "primaryKey":1
   }
]

Full response example

"fields":
[
  {
      "name": "id",
      "type": "bigint",
      "length": null,
      "scale": null,
      "autoValue": "none",
      "defaultValue": null,
      "nullable": false,
      "primaryKey": 1
  }
]

Property summary

Table 3. "fields" property summaries

Property

Description

Default

Type

Limits (inclusive)

"autoValue"

controls when and how the server automatically sets the field value

""

string

"none"
"incrementOnInsert"
"timestampOnInsert"
"timestampOnUpdate"
"timestampOnUpdateAndInsert"
"changeid"

"defaultValue"

specifies the default value of a field

string

Minimum length: 0
Maximum length: 65500

"length"

defines the length of a field's value in a record

integer

1 - 65500

"name"

defines a new name of the field

string

Minimum length: 0
Maximum length: 64

"nullable"

allows a field to contain a NULL value when true

Boolean

true
false

"primaryKey"

adds a field to the specified ordinal position of the table's primary key when > 0

integer

0 - 32

"scale"

defines the number of places to the right of the decimal point

integer

0 - 32

"type"

defines the type of field

string

"bit"
"tinyint"
"smallint"
"integer"
"bigint"
"real"
"double"
"number"
"money"
"date"
"time"
"timestamp"
"char"
"varchar"
"lvarchar"
"binary"
"varbinary"
"lvarbinary"
"json"


This property controls when and how the server automatically sets the field value.

Specify only one of these values per field.

  • "none" indicates the server does not automatically set the field's value.

  • "incrementOnInsert" indicates the server automatically increments a field’s value each time the server inserts a new record. It applies to fields that are of the type of decimal or one of the integer types, such as "bigint". Only one field per table can have this attribute. The server returns an error when assigning this attribute to multiple fields. The JSON DB API automatically creates the "id" field as an "incrementOnInsert" field. If you apply this attribute to another field, it becomes the only automatically incremented field in the table. If you want that field to be the primary key, assign  "primaryKey": 1 to it.

  • "timestampOnInsert" indicates the server automatically sets a field’s value to the current date and time of an insert. It applies only to fields with a type of "timestamp".

  • "timestampOnUpdate" indicates the server automatically sets a field’s value to the current date and time of an update. It applies only to timestamp fields.

  • "timestampOnUpdateAndInsert" indicates the server automatically sets a field’s value to the current date and time of an insert and an update. It applies only to fields with a type of "timestamp".

  • "changeId" indicates the server uses the field for optimistic locking. The server automatically sets the field's value to the internal transaction number used during the last update of the record. This value changes each time the server updates the record. A table may only have one change tracking field. The field type must be "bigint".

    The JSON DB API automatically creates a "changeid" field with change-tracking functionality.

    Change tracking is optional in the CTDB and ISAM APIs. The application must create a 64-bit integer field and assign change-tracking functionality to it.

The "requestedRecordCount" property is a signed, 32-bit integer set by the server in response to the "getRecordsFromCursor" method.

Things to know:
  • It makes it easy to know how many records were requested in the last call to "getRecordsFromCursor".

  • An application can use "requestedRecordCount" in conjunction with "returnedRecordCount" to determine if fewer records were returned than requested, which occurs when the cursor reaches the end of the recordset.

The "returnedRecordCount" is a 32-bit integer set by the server in response to the "getRecordsFromCursor" method.

Things to know:
  • It makes it easy to know how many records were returned from the last call to "getRecordsFromCursor".

  • An application can use "returnedRecordCount" in conjunction with "requestedRecordCount" to determine if fewer records were returned than requested, which occurs when the cursor reaches the end of the recordset.

The "totalRecordCount" property contains the total available number of records that can be returned from a query.

Things to know:
  • The "totalRecordCount" is set to -1, when the server does not know the total record count.

  • A very fast way to get the total number of records in a table is to call the "getRecordsByTable" method without applying a "tableFilter". This immediately returns the count without reading and counting records.

  • For most methods, the server does not calculate "totalRecordCount" because calculating it requires walking all records in the query, which may take a significant amount of time.

  • When the result is returned as a cursor, "totalRecordCount" is the total number of records that the cursor can traverse.

    Note

    This does not apply to cursor responses.

  • When the result returns records directly, "totalRecordCount" is the total number of records that can be retrieved – not necessarily the number of records returned.